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Home » Eye Care Services » Answers To Common Questions

Answers To Common Questions

Question: What can I do to prevent Dry Eyes?

Answer:
There is no absolute cure or prevention but there are indeed a few things you can do to lessen its impact or presence.

  1. Stay hydrated – drink lots of good water daily.
  2. Minimize use of ceiling fan in bedroom while sleeping. If needed, use reverse cycle on fan motor, if possible, to circulate air outward vs straight downward.
  3. Intake of 1000mg daily of pharmaceutical grade Omega-3 with higher content of DHA vs EPA.
  4. Overall healthy diet low in sugar and salt content·

Learn more


glasses cute child thinking bubble
Question:
At what age should my child have his/her eyes examined?

Answer:
By age 3 if you suspect a problem such as an eye turning in or out. Otherwise by age 5 when they start formal schooling.·

Question:
Can kids wear contact lenses?

Answer:
Absolutely! Children are wonderful contact lens patients. As in any medical device on human tissue – which is why it requires a separate one year lasting prescription – there are inherent possible risks. It really depends on the level of responsibility of both the parents as well as the child as to when any child or adult should wear contact lenses safely.·

Question:
Should I wear sunglasses during the winter?

Answer:
It makes no difference what time of year it is – potentially harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun are still present,, even on very cloudy days. So it is a very good idea to wear sunglasses whenever you are outdoors. In addition, the glare that can reflect off cars, buildings and the water and snow can be harmful over time as well. Polarized lenses are ideal, especially under glare conditions·

Question:
What is color blindness?

Answer:
True color “blindness” is rare. Color “deficiencies” are more common. It actually refers to the lowered ability to detect certain colors. Red-green color deficiency is the most common form. These colors are perceived as more of different shades of gray and people learn to tell the difference.

Question:
Why is my vision going bad once I turned 50?

Answer:
Actually it is closer to 40 when we can start to notice more difficulty in reading and seeing near objects as clearly as we were accustomed. What’s happening is the focusing muscles in our eyes and the focusing power of the lens inside our eye is becoming less flexible in our 40’s and beyond. This is a normal and expected aging process. One can expect our near and intermediate vision to continue to change every year or two into our mid 50’s. Beyond that, the lens of our eyes continues to age and which will eventually lead to a ongoing cataract which is a clouding of that lens typically over a many year period.

baby swaddled in white with flower petalsQuestion:
Can I wear my contact lenses while I sleep?

Answer:
Yes, but under very strict conditions. Occasional overnight use is acceptable but increased open eye and overnight rest of your eyes is highly recommended by most experts and researchers for greater safety.

Question:
When I read a label on food items, I need to move it further away from me. What’s happening?

Answer:
As we reach closer to 40 years of age and beyond our natural focusing system – for which we have taken for granted – starts to lose its flexibility. This is a normal, age-related process and is nothing to be alarmed about. A thorough eye examination will result in a recommended prescription customized to your particular eyes and vision demands.

receptionist answering insurance questionQuestion:
Will my insurance plan cover my new glasses?

Answer:
If you have a dedicated and separate routine vision benefit plan ( such as VSP or EyeMed and others) annual benefits are available to help defray the cost of your eye examination, contact lens examination and the cost of your eyeglasses needed. Medical insurance only covers a medical reason(s) for care and treatment.

Question:
Are disposable contact lenses good for my eyes?

Answer:
Planned replacement of contact lenses are the standard of contact lens care today. Daily disposable contact lenses are increasingly popular nowadays. The reasons for this trend is the higher safety profile, comfort and convenience of more frequent replacement with fresher lenses when worn. Simply, people are just happier!

Question:
Can I borrow and use someone else’s glasses?

Answer:
Not at all! Every eyeglass prescription is customized to that person’s eyes and vision performance. Wearing another’s glasses is likely to lead to eyestrain and headache but with no permanent damage.

receptionist answering insurance questionQuestion:
Why shouldn’t I buy my eye wear over the internet?

Answer:
Just as eyeglasses prescriptions are highly customized to one’s own vision, so too are how that eyeglass frame is measured to your face with that prescription. Many parameters are involved to ensure optimum optical performance, not the least of which is the precise placement of the optical centers of your new lenses as electronically measured by the PD (pupillary distance). Inaccurate PD alone can cause significant discomfort and eyestrain/headache by virtue of inducing unwanted prismatic effects in your vision, rendering your new eyeglasses totally unusable.

Question:
What are cataracts and how can they be treated?

Answer:
A cataract is not a disease but is a normal age-related process of the clouding of the lens in our eye and located right behind your pupil. This slow process begins in our 40’s an continues typically into our 60’s and 70’s at which time it will likely be significant enough to adversely affect our everyday visual lifestyle and requiring removal. When performed the natural lens is replaced with an inert acrylic small lend implant in the same place as our natural lens. Calculating its correct replacement power restores your normal vision in just minutes. Cataract surgery today is the safest and most commonly performed medical procedure in the world.

Question:
Can I wear contacts when I’m swimming?sports swimming girl underwater goggles

Answer:
Yes you very well can do that. But not if you like to open your eyes under water for fear of losing your contacts.. You can certainly do so behind a dive mask or swimming goggles.

 

 

Question:
Why should I take a photo of my retina during my eye exam?

Answer:
Although not a prerequisite for a thorough, comprehensive eye exam it does provide a wonderful footprint and baseline for later comparison at annual or more frequent follow-up examinations for early detection. Be well-advised there is no substitute for an eye doctor looking carefully into your dilated pupils with stereoscopic microscope and diligently recording their own live observations.

Question:
Is it okay to purchase my eyeglasses online? Answered above but copied and pasted:

Answer:
Not recommended and here’s why. Just as eyeglasses prescriptions are highly customized to one’s own vision, so too are how that eyeglass frame is measured to your face with that prescription. Many parameters are involved to ensure optimum optical performance, not the least of which is the precise placement of the optical centers of your new lenses as electronically measured by the PD ( pupillary distance). Inaccurate PD alone can cause significant discomfort and eyestrain/headache by virtue of inducing unwanted prismatic effects in your vision, rendering your new eyeglasses totally unusable.

 

Question:
Are carrots really good for my eyes? Are there other foods that are beneficial for my vision health?

Answer:
Yes carrots are good for your eyes because of the anti-oxidant beta-carotene in them. However, you would have to consume unpractical large quantities to get the benefits you are looking for. Generally speaking the more colorful the vegetable the better it is for your eyes and all organs of your entire body, e.g., broccoli, yellow squash, etc. Today’s research supports more emphasis on nutritional supplementation, particularly for eyes and vision, especially if your family medical eye history is positive for macular degeneration. In particular, the macular pigments lutein and zeathanin are now more readily available over the counter. Be sure they are “pharmaceutical grade” and have the “GMP” labeling.

Question:
Is wearing makeup or eye mascara harmful to my eyes?

Answer:
Not if applied appropriately. Water based makeup is much kinder to your eyes than oil or wax based(“waterproof” formulations. Although more popular among the younger crowd it is especially not recommended to apply makeup inside the smooth margin of your eyelids and where spillover of makeup is a common cause of chronic eye irritation and even red eyes.

Question:
I have trouble driving at night. What can I do to improve my night vision?

Answer:
A thorough eye health and vision examination is strongly recommended. This symptom is often the first sign of a need for a vision correction. Also it is often a sign that your eyeglass and/or your contact lens prescription has changed but could be a sign of more internal eye issue.

Question:
Why is my child having trouble reading and concentrating on schoolwork?

Answer:
A thorough optometric vision and eye health evaluation is indeed indicated. It is not uncommon for school learning and reading/comprehension skills, and even chronic headaches at end of day, to be vision-related. Near point focusing inflexibility can be detected and treated to allow for much improved school performance.

Q&A for Keratoconus

Question:

What is Keratoconus?

Answer:
Keratoconus (KC) is an slowly degenerative condition involving an abnormal thinning and protrusion of the eye’s front window surface, called the cornea, that distorts vision..

Question:
Are some people more likely to develop it?

Answer:
Keratoconus is more often discovered in males and often first detected in their 20’s. It is also more often observed with those who have allergies and those who rub their eyes a lot.

Question:
How would someone know if they have it?

Answer:
Often first detection occurs when their seemingly best eyeglass correction becomes no longer satisfactory. Streaks and glare around streetlights are commonly reported.

Question:
How do eye doctors diagnose Keratoconus?

Answer:
A thorough eye examination is required and acute listening to patient’s quality of vision concerns. The most definite test for more accurately diagnosing Keratoconus is called topography.

Question:
What consequences can occur if Keratoconus is left untreated?

Answer:
There is no cure but when left untreated, Keratoconus can lead to central corneal scarring which severely decreases best vision. At this point a corneal transplant is indicated.

Question:
How do you treat Keratoconus? Are there risks involved in the treatment?

Answer:
In its very early stages, Keratoconus can be treated with the usual and customary eyeglass or soft contact lens prescriptions. Rigid gas permeable or hybrid contact lenses are indicated when eyeglass or conventional contact lenses become no longer adequate. A recently FDA approved procedure, called Collagen Cross-Linking, has been showing great promise to help slow down the degenerative nature of this disease.

Our optometrists are happy to answer all your eye care. Contact us today to discuss your eye health.